Archive for the ‘conclusions’ Tag

ITIL Conclusions

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  • Proof that the adoption of ITIL produces, for most of those who measure it, a real improvement in service levels to the user base as customer.
  • More than half of adopting companies measured a distinct improvement in customer satisfaction.
  • ITIL benefits staff. Not only does their work competence increase, but so does their job satisfaction.
  • The size of your company is no limit to or likelihood of your adopting ITIL or not. Size does not appear to make a difference. You can take up ITIL with just two people in the IT department.
  • The typical ratio of IT headcount to userbase is around four to six percent – this by-product of the survey could be seen as a staffing benchmark.
  • Taking up ITIL still remains a matter of deliberate choice rather than a must-have. This is encouraging for ITIL as a philosophy, for it suggests that despite the method’s recent prominence, it is not a passing fad or the latest IT lifestyle, but the subject of serious strategic consideration.
  • Those who adopt ITIL have a slightly heightened tendency to adopt other external practice standards in their business. Those who reject ITIL are highly likely to reject other standards also.
  • Smaller companies are more likely to be among the group rejecting ITIL. Despite its apparent workability in smaller, even tiny IT departments, the methodology is still typically the premise of the larger organisation.
  • At this stage in ITIL’s development, it is by design a methodology, not an industry standard to which companies can adhere.
  • ITIL-based companies see one of the main benefits as being the unification of the whole of IT under common practices – but ITIL alone will not necessarily deliver this. The active participation of as many departments as possible is crucial.
  • ITIL can be adopted exclusively within IT, without necessarily accounting for existing business practices and strategies.
  • A fifth of adopting companies acknowledged that ITIL had indeed given them a competitive advantage in their company’s market – and as by definition not everybody can be market leaders, this fifth reflects a commercially significant benefit to ITIL.
  • For any desired benefit, the implementers must take specific and careful steps to ensure that it comes about. Clear goals and a consistent pursuit of them are critical so the benefit does not become one of the ubiquitous ‘Almost Delivered’.
  • ITIL is an IT matter only. Business strategic, commercial and political matters, although important on an organisational scale, are not necessarily components of the ITIL implementation.
  • All sections at all levels of IT should be prepared for procedural and operational change. Concentrated study of IT procedures will be paramount and unavoidable.
  • Despite all the processes mentioned in ITIL, it remains incomplete. Adopting companies found a need to add other processes beyond those described in the ITIL literature.
  • Two thirds of those using software to support ITIL adoption found that the software had to be customised even where the software was aimed at the ITIL market.
  • There is no single way of ‘being ITIL compliant’ because the flexibility of the methodology renders the concept of ‘compliance’ irrelevant in an ITIL context.
  • First-time-fix and time-to-fix improvements delivered by ITIL have cost justification implications because quicker fixes mean that users are losing less downtime in the helpdesk queue. This service increase translates directly into a business benefit.
  • There is a trade-off between expedition and accuracy. The records in the CMDB do not just impact IT, but have a business implication, for they are a list of valuable hardware assets. Perhaps it is worth seeing a reduction in service level in exchange for an increase in the integrity of management information.
  • Benchmark the services prior to adoption in light of a probable benefit thereafter.
  • In nearly three quarters of cases, ITIL can be implemented with the same or ultimately fewer staff than at present.
  • ITIL is not a cure for all procedural ills or absences – its processes, though detailed, do not cover everything, as experienced implementers overwhelmingly agree.