Service Desk Survival Guide

Asses your operations

· Conduct a benchmarking assessment

· Listen to your customer, team, peers, etc. (Sit in on the phones).

· Challenge your direct reports (“How Do you know” and “Show me”).

· D3 – Drill Down into the Details

· Enlist a Third Party Service Desk Expert

o Methodology

o Preparation

o Urgency

o Timeliness

o Executive Briefing

Review your Delivered Services

· List Services Currently Delivered

· Rank in Order of Importance/Value To Customer

· Categorize Services Into Problem And Request

· Identify Services Where You Add No Value

o Look for ways to Deflect or Eliminate

· Estimate Cost To Deliver Services

· Map Your Team’s Skills To Your Services

· Any thing left over for the valued services?

Know What and Who You Should Know

· Identify the Critical Elements of Your Support Business

o Supply, Demand and SLA adherence

o Total Cost of Support, Cost per Contact and Solution

o Don’t forget the customer’s who stopped calling!

o Service Desk Professional Utilization

o Top 5 Call Types by Volume and Mean Time To Resolve

· Identify and Report Business Impact and Employee Productivity Trends

o Barriers to Total Contact Ownership

· Identify Key Sponsors and Champions of Service Desk

o Senior Level Management

o Customers

o Business Drivers

Invest in Training Your Team

· Increase productivity

o High Impact Training

o Screen Human Harmony

o Automate the Manual

· No better time

o Create Career paths

o Invest in Training and Certification

o Mentor and Coach

· Former Intel CEO Andy Grove says never forget that your career is your business:

o “Every person … is like an individual business. Your career is your business –and you are its CEO.”

o Although your career may be on track, be sure not to ignore turning points that could lead to greater success –or bitter failure.

o You’ve got to keep track of the market, watch for competitors and look for better ways to do things.

· Grove says a “mental fire drill” can help every career

o Read newspapers, trade magazines and books (“Leaders are Readers”)

o Attend industry conferences

o Listen to associates to learn when change is imminent

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